Minions and the Cheesewring

As I continued to make my way through the 40 different sausage selections to choose from at the B&B for breakfast I needed to get out and stretch my legs. Without really knowing I had already walked up and around the highest peak in Cornwall last month, so chose one of the more heritage areas around Minions this time around.

One of the engine houses of the South Phoenix Mine is now the Minions Heritage Centre The view of Stowes Hill with The Hurlers stone circles in the foreground View from Stowes Hill looking towards the Cheesewring

Minions is the highest village in Cornwall, high up on Bodmin moor, and was totally created for the needs of the local industries: mining, quarrying and railways. It was almost entirely constructed in the few years between1863 and 1880. The area though is thought to have been inhabited for around 6,000 years, and old field systems and settlement areas can still be seen amidst the moorland, though they can be more clearly seen in Google Maps.

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Tregothnan, what a corker!

The weather was not good, and the forecast was not much better, but I had to do something today having had a very good breakfast (continuing to work my way through the 40 different sausage selections to choose from at the B&B!). Andy and Jane recommended that I visit Tregothnan, the traditional home of the Boscawen family, and the seat of Lord Falmouth, which is only open for one weekend of the year and this weekend is it – looks like my luck was in, lets hope it holds.

Tregothnan: The House at the Head of the Valley - and really long drive Tree ferns at Tregothnan

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Exeter Cathedral

Exeter Cathedral On my way back from Cornwall I stopped off in Exeter, intrigued to see a city that I have passed by a number of times on journeys to the southwest.

The cathedral was beautiful, and as it has no central tower it has the longest uninterrupted vaulted ceiling in England – there are lots of great pictures of the inside here on Flickr.

On the outside there was someone halfway up a tower working on the building.

Exeter Cathedral Exeter Cathedral Exeter Cathedral

The Eden Project

Temperate biome The Core and Biomes at Eden Seed by Peter Randall-Page at the Eden Project

I spent a really interesting day at the Eden Project, and had a very sociable time. There was not much time to take many pictures, and the weather was pretty lousy with heavy rain, sleet, hail and strong winds – I was glad to be hunkered down in an old china clay pit rather than on top of a moor.

The last time I had visited the Seed sculpture by Peter Randall-Page had yet to be lowered into place within the central space of The Core education centre. To see it in situ was great – it is quite a piece of stone!

More photos from the trip to Cornwall can be found here.

Stonehenge

Stonehenge in silhouette Stonehenge in silhouette

Heading down to Cornwall for a few days and stopped off at Stonehenge to stretch my legs.  The weather was cold, but the sun was out and I managed to get a couple of photos from over the fence with the henge in silhouette.
If only the catering was up to scratch I would have stopped for a nice cup of tea.

Kent coast from the air, well GoogleEarth

Kent from GoogleEarth - looks like the oilseed rape is in flower! It has been a couple of weeks since I completed my walk around the coast of Kent, and I have just read that Google have just updated their high resolution photographs for Kent. As I write they are on GoogleEarth now, but it is normally a few days before they are on GoogleMaps.

Did they get me? Am I on GoogleEarth?? What are the views like…

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